Ethics and Human-Animal-Studies

The relation between human and nonhuman animals is currently changing. This has a far-ranging impact on human acting and human self-understanding. This impact causes a need for orientation in different areas.

Philosophical and especially ethical research can enlighten this relation, bring up relevant questions, implement them into the social discourse, and found approaches. In the light of new possibilities and insights more and more new questions concerning the human-animal interaction arise which should do justice to them and to us as humans. For example: interacting with animals in laboratories is to be tied to normative criteria (e.g. the 3R-principles) which connect scientific interests to ethical concerns. For the unit „Ethics and Human-Animal-Studies“ the interdisciplinary work with staff from the natural sciences is therefore of great importance. 

The heterogeneous team of the unit „Ethics and Human-Animal-Studies“ comprises scientists with different backgrounds, research interests and expertise and is concerned with the complexity of the human-animal-relationship.

 
 [Link 1]
 

Field of Activities

Research projects:

Developing a catalogue of criteria to evaluate research proposals including animal testing
 [Link 2]

VETHICS FOR VETS - ethics for veterinary officers [Link 3]

Scientific responsibility in animal experiments [Link 4]

Phenomenological theory of the human-animal relationship [Link 5]

Morality in Animals [Link 6]

Instrumentalization as an ethically relevant criterion. A bioethical analysis and evaluation of SCNT cloning in nonhuman mammalians [Link 7]

Socio-cognitive abilities in animals and their relevance for animal ethics and animal welfare [Link 8]

 

The 3R-Principles

1. Replacement: the use of methods which replace the research on animals, e.g. with computer modelling

 

2. Refinement: the advancement of the conditions of keeping laboratory animals and of using them for research reasons, e.g. the regard for typal needs or the use of anesthetics and analgetics, etc. 

 

3. Reducement: the use of methods which minimize the number of animals employed for the research, e.g. the basic design of the experiments or advanced statistic tools.