Little owl in great danger

Left to right: Wolfgang Pegler (Chairman „Wagrampur“), Richard Zink (Head of the AOC branch in Seebarn), Alfred Riedl (Gemeindebund-Präsident), Rector Petra Winter, Mike Ulzer (Weinhof Ulzer); Photo: E. Hammerschmid
group photo of participants with Little owl poster

The characteristic call of the little owl is rarely heard in Austria, because the small owl species is threatened with extinction. Due to the increasing loss of habitat, little owls can only find few breeding sites and suitable living conditions. Together with the “Wagrampur” association and committed winegrowers in Austria's wine-growing regions, the Austrian Ornithological Centre would like to promote sustainable, future-oriented protective measures for this endangered bird species. The AOC with its branch in Seebarn am Wagram (Lower Austria) offers bird-related know-how as the basis for the "comeback" of little owls and other bird species. In cooperation with the “Wagrampur” association, framework conditions are being created for the resettlement of the little owl.

On September 17, 2020, a photo and press meeting took place in the branch of the AOC branch in Seebarn am Wagram to raise awareness on the need for the protection of the little owl in Lower Austria. In addition to Petra Winter, Rector of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna and Richard Zink (Head of the AOC branch in Seebarn), Alfred Riedl (Mayor of Grafenwörth and President of the Association of Municipalities), the winemaker Mike Ulzer (Weinhof Ulzer) and Wolfgang Pegler (Chairman of the “Wagrampur “) took part.

You can help save the little owl with a donation 1.

(Web editor, 18 September 2020)

 

5th bird ringer meeting at the Biology Centre Linz

Photo (c) Anne Hloch/AOC
group picture of bird ringers 2

On Saturday, February 8th, 2020, the AOC held the 5th annual bird ringing meeting. The Biology Centre Linz generously made its premises available for this. Varied lectures were on the programme for more than 20 participants: topics were as diverse as the resilience of snow sparrows to the marking and sending of gray geese in Seewinkel, and ringing of rescued birds in Upper Austria.

The AOC team would like to thank the Biology Centre Linz, the lecturers and all conference guests for the successful event and the nice atmosphere!

(Web editor, 17 February 2020)

 

Out of Africa: migratory birds fly to Europe earlier and earlier

Bird species that winter in North Africa and the Sahel have shifted their migration time more than those that winter further south, in the tropical forests of Central Africa. (Photo: Garden warbler, by CISCA)
Garden warbler

In response to climate change, the spring migration of many migratory birds is shifting ever further forward. However, according to a study presented by an international research team led by Ivan Maggini and Leonida Fusani from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Comparative Behavioral Research at Vetmeduni Vienna , this change does not follow a uniform pattern. On the contrary, closer inspection reveals a complex picture: Essential for the start of the migration is the region of wintering. 

It is known from previous studies that migratory birds bring forward their spring arrival in European breeding areas due to climate change. In addition, those species that are less able to adapt their migratory time suffer a decline in their population in Europe. It is therefore reasonable to assume that the cause of their decline is the inability to adapt the timing of their migration.  Fusani and Maggini - in collaboration with an international research team on Ponza - analyzed the migratory periods of the 30 species most frequently counted on the island during the last 18 years. 

Climate change affects different living beings in many different ways. In Europe, the early spring favors an earlier appearance of insects, which in turn affects the breeding season of insectivorous birds. By breeding earlier, they ensure that they find enough food to feed their young. However, many migratory birds are not able to observe seasonally changing, favorable conditions in their European breeding areas because they spend the winter thousands of kilometers away in Africa. Their internal clock stimulates them to leave their winter quarters at the appropriate time. In the face of climate change, it is therefore increasingly a challenge to adapt departure times in such a way that migratory birds are offered the maximum possible food sources on arrival at their destination in Europe.

The article "Recent phenological shifts of migratory birds at a Mediterranean spring stopover site: species wintering in the Sahel advance passage more than tropical winterers 3“ by Ivan Maggini, Massimiliano Cardinale, Jonas Hentati Sundberg, Fernando Spina, and Leonida Fusani was published in PLOS ONE.

(Web editor, 7 October 2020)

 

Little owl in great danger

Left to right: Wolfgang Pegler (Chairman „Wagrampur“), Richard Zink (Head of the AOC branch in Seebarn), Alfred Riedl (Gemeindebund-Präsident), Rector Petra Winter, Mike Ulzer (Weinhof Ulzer); Photo: E. Hammerschmid
group photo of participants with Little owl poster

The characteristic call of the little owl is rarely heard in Austria, because the small owl species is threatened with extinction. Due to the increasing loss of habitat, little owls can only find few breeding sites and suitable living conditions. Together with the “Wagrampur” association and committed winegrowers in Austria's wine-growing regions, the Austrian Ornithological Centre would like to promote sustainable, future-oriented protective measures for this endangered bird species. The AOC with its branch in Seebarn am Wagram (Lower Austria) offers bird-related know-how as the basis for the "comeback" of little owls and other bird species. In cooperation with the “Wagrampur” association, framework conditions are being created for the resettlement of the little owl.

On September 17, 2020, a photo and press meeting took place in the branch of the AOC branch in Seebarn am Wagram to raise awareness on the need for the protection of the little owl in Lower Austria. In addition to Petra Winter, Rector of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna and Richard Zink (Head of the AOC branch in Seebarn), Alfred Riedl (Mayor of Grafenwörth and President of the Association of Municipalities), the winemaker Mike Ulzer (Weinhof Ulzer) and Wolfgang Pegler (Chairman of the “Wagrampur “) took part.

You can help save the little owl with a donation 1.

(Web editor, 18 September 2020)

 

Excursion: Owls in the Vienna Woods

Photo © Erik Karits/Pixabay
Ural owl on a tree with grey bark

Join as in Naturpark Sparbach 4, in den Southern Vienna Woods, and discover the habitat of all kinds of owls during a guided hike through the woods.   At the end of February the owl mating season reaches its peak.  Before females start breeding, the owls are duelling with songs.  Experience their songs and learn more about the different owl species that reside in the Vienna Woods, about their behaviour and habits.  

 

When: 21 February 2020, 4:45 p.m. [Substitute date if the weather is bad: 28 February 2020]

Where: 2393 Naturpark Sparbach, you will receive the exact location after registering

Cost: Free donation

Registration: seebarn[@]vetmeduni.ac.at, excursion for adults

Tip: warm clothing and robust shoes.  Binoculars recommended

Donations will benefit bird protection in the region. 

  

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