Vetucation® Award 2019

"Learning outcomes are an important indicator of whether knowledge transfer efforts are well received and ultimately successful."

Following this quote from Sibylle Kneissl, Vice Rector for Teaching, this year's Teaching Vets Symposium took place on 24 October 2019 with the motto "Student Assessment". In addition to exciting keynote speeches, the challenging task this year was again to determine the winners of the Vetucation® Award 2019 from the submitted projects.

In the category "Existing E-Learning Projects" Bianca Patan-Zugaj (Institute for Topographical Anatomy) was able to win the award with her project on "X-ray Anatomy: Horse Limbs".

f.l.t.r.: Sibylle Kneissl (Vizerektorin für Lehre), Catharina Duvigneau, Katrin Schieder, Bianca Patan-Zugaj, Susanne Waiblinger, Mehrzad Hamzelo (Leiterin der Abt. E-Learning und Neue Medien) © Ernst Hammerschmid
Group photo existing E-Learning Projects f.l.t.r.: Sibylle Kneissl (Vizerektorin für Lehre), Catharina Duvigneau, Katrin Schieder, Bianca Patan-Zugaj, Susanne Waiblinger, Mehrzad Hamzelo (Leiterin der Abt. E-Learning und Neue Medien) © Ernst Hammerschmid 1
 

In the category "E-learning projects in the making" Julia Hruza received an award for the Clinical Department of Equine Surgery for her project, which deals with the creation of an extensive case study for the castration of a horse.

f.l.t.r.: Sibylle Kneissl, Julia Hruza, Till Rümenapf, Mehrzad Hamzelo © Ernst Hammerschmid
Group photo E-learning projects in the making f.l.t.r.: Sibylle Kneissl, Julia Hruza, Till Rümenapf, Mehrzad Hamzelo © Ernst Hammerschmid 2
 

The E-Learning and New Media Department congratulates not only the winners of the Vetucation® Award 2019, but all this year's project submitters for their outstanding projects and their valuable contributions to online teaching at Vetmeduni Vienna.

Further impressions and everything about the Teaching Vets Symposium #5 on our News page. 3

 

X-ray anatomy: limb of the horse

Bianca Patan-Zugaj presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf
Bianca Patan-Zugaj presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf 4

Main submitter: Bianca Patan-Zugaj

University Institution: Institute of Topographical Anatomy

Project summary

In the course of a MindMap, the X-ray anatomy of the most common X-ray images of the horse's limbs is treated. This e-learning tool serves as a supplement to lectures and exercises in imaging anatomy and is intended to help students to recognize important anatomical structures on X-ray images and to present them correctly.

An animated image of a bone preparation (shown in different directions) can be called up to repeat the anatomical technical terms, in which important bone points are marked. The students first consider themselves how these bone dots are named and can check their answers themselves, since the correct technical term can be displayed by mouse-over.
In addition, the X-ray images are compared with photos of corresponding bone preparations. In addition, the images were animated in order to be able to display the displayed bones, joints and important bone points as contours in the X-ray image using a mouse-over.

 

Being able to name salts - Does learning work better with Memories in Vetucation®?

Catharina Duvigneau presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf
Catharina Duvigneau presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf 5

Main submitter: Catharina Duvigneau

University Institution: Institute of Medical Biochemistry

Other project participants: Andrea Müllebner, Rudolf Moldzio

Project summary

The hook is a press release: "Infusions confused: Charges against two nurses. The infusions had been misclassified by colleagues, the two accused are said not to have checked the labels of the salt solutions before use." The following questions arise: Can our students correctly name common salts when they see the sum formulas? Can they write down the sum formulas of potassium chloride and calcium chloride, for example, or would they confuse the two salts?

One of the aims of the second semester is to know the sum formulas of common salts and their nomenclature. In order to motivate students to practice these contents independently, memorys were created which can be played with and without in-depth questions for understanding.

 

HowtoCow

Susanne Waiblinger presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf
Susanne Waiblinger presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf 6

Main submitter: Susanne Waiblinger

University Institution: Institute for Animal Welfare Sciences and Animal Husbandry

Other project participants: Monika Zandra

Project summary

As part of the Game Based Learning approach, a game ("HowtoCow") was developed on the subject of herding a cow. The basic principles (avoidance zone, equilibrium point, blind zone, frightening, slow vs. fast procedure) are to be learned playfully. The avoidance behaviour of a cow is simulated. Nine different levels show situations in which a cow is to be brought to the correct destination by a player. The control is done via keyboard and/or mouse.  The difficulty of the levels is based on each other.

 

Teaching video material for X-ray examination of the fetlock joint on a standing horse

Katrin Schieder presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf
Katrin Schieder presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf 7

Main submitter: Katrin Schieder

University Institution: Clinical Department of Imaging Diagnostics

Other project participants: Anna Herk, Martina Unterwurzacher, Michael Bernkopf, Alexander Wijnants

Project summary

An instructional video was shot showing the production of standard radiographic projections of the fetlock joint of a front leg in a horse. This video is made available on Vetucation® and is intended to guide and prepare students for the course.
In addition, a video with the same sequences and intentionally built in errors was produced to encourage students to critically view the scene depicted.

 

In the category "E-learning projects in the making"

 

The castration of a horse: surgery, preparation and follow-up by students: an interactive clinical learning case as a peer-to-peer project.

Julia Hruza presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf
Julia Hruza presenting her E-Learning project © Michael Bernkopf 8

Main submitter: Julia Hruza

University Institution: Clinical Department of Equine Surgery

Other project participants: Sabine Sykora, Florian Buchner

Project summary

In the exercises of Special Propaedeutics I, the students learn knowledge and skills of general surgery such as surgical preparation, hygiene measures, instruments and the various work steps involved in an operation. By providing particularly descriptive and entertaining learning material, the students should also be intrinsically motivated to acquire the knowledge before the exercise. The interactive case study, based on a real case, is intended to establish a descriptive reference to the practice and the profession later carried out. Specifically, a horse and a student will be accompanied during an operation and its preparation and follow-up with pictures and videos. The students get to know the processes in the clinic and can check their background knowledge with quiz questions.

 

Learning video clips "Essential Virology"

Till Rümenapf presenting his E-Learning Project © Michael Bernkopf
Till Rümenapf presenting his E-Learning Project © Michael Bernkopf 9

Main submitter: Till Rümenapf

University Institution: Institute of Virology

Other project participants: Michaela Ernst, Eric-Philipp Gschwendner, Vetmeduni Vienna theatre group

Project summary

The planned project "Essential Virology" will attempt to complement organ-centred teaching with comprehensive knowledge in a series of short animated educational films. It is well known that it is not easy to present dry learning content in an appealing and entertaining way without sacrificing depth and academic standards. A visual - acoustic format in the form of a puppet theatre was deliberately chosen to convey the essential knowledge of the most important virus families in veterinary medicine in just a few minutes. Animal figures are brought to life by the student theatre group of the Vetmeduni Vienna and, in the tradition of the "Muppet Show", exchange their opinions and knowledge about viral diseases with a guest expert.